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dementia

Memory Loss: When to be Worried and How to Help

When keys are so easy to lose, there’s no need to panic when you or your elderly loved one misplaces them. The same goes for forgetting names or mixing up words. Everyone can forget an appointment, forget that one word “on the tip of their tongue” or become easily distracted. But for the 5.5 million Americans inflicted by Alzheimer’s disease, others affected by one of the 70 types of dementia and the families that love them, these signs of memory loss may trigger significant worry. There is a difference between normal age-related memory loss and serious memory impairment. As we…

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Catching the Signs of Mental Illness in the Elderly

mental illness in the elderly

When Laurie became mentally ill, she remained blissfully unaware. She saw no reason to doubt her own sanity based on interactions with her daughter and grandchildren, who visited once a week. They treated her like they always had, and responded to her in the usual ways. Eventually, she started noticing that it took a bit more effort to make sense of the news every night. One afternoon, despite her best efforts, she couldn’t finish that newspaper crossword puzzle she had been doing for the last 15 years. But that was because she was 82 years old! And when she stopped…

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The Connection Between Diabetes and Dementia

Those with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing chronic cardiovascular conditions, but could it also be affecting your brain? Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the country, and puts you at risk for other serious conditions like heart disease and stroke. Recent studies have found that diabetes may also increase the risk of diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia. The Journal of the American Medical Association said the link between diabetes and dementia is hypoglycemia – low blood sugar. Our brains use glucose (sugar) for energy. When blood glucose levels are too low, like in…

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Are We Close to a Cure for Alzheimer’s?

One of the most devastating things to hear is that a senior loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Families can feel helpless as they watch the disease slowly progress and change their loved one into a completely different person. It destroys brain cells and leads to memory loss, decline in brain function, and ultimately, death. To date, there is still no cure. Over 5 million American seniors have Alzheimer’s disease, a number that is expected to increase 40 percent to reach over 7 million by 2025. As of now, there are Alzheimer’s treatments that improve symptoms like memory…

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Cognitive Decline in Seniors: Dementia and Alzheimer’s

senior caregiver scrabble grandchild

A recent study from the Global Burden of Disease found that between 1990 and 2013, there was a 92 percent increase in the number of dementia-related deaths and years lived with disability due to dementia. Currently, 47.5 million people worldwide suffer from dementia, and that number is expected to nearly triple by 2050. In 2015 Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia will cost the United States $226 billion. “In less than a quarter of a century we have seen a staggering increase in the number of people living with dementia globally,” said Dr. James Pickett, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s…

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